Morgaine

Posts Tagged ‘group: writer to writer’

Kurt Vonnegut Library

In Too lazy to assign a category on May 14, 2007 at 10:22 am

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This website contains all of Kurt Vonnegut’s novels in .pdf form, hosted by the amazing Scribd.

When you click on a link to a book from the “Archives” page, you will be directed to a page that contains the book in Scribd’s Adobe Flashplayer based .pdf viewer. The .pdf player allows you to view the book through TKVL’s website, or to download it in several different formats that include .doc and .pdf. Enjoy!

 The Kurt Vonnegut Library

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15 Things Kurt Vonnegut Said Better Than Anyone Else Ever Has Or Will

In Too lazy to assign a category on April 30, 2007 at 10:58 pm

1. "I urge you to please notice when you are happy, and exclaim or murmur or think at some point, 'If this isn't nice, I don't know what is.'"

2. "Peculiar travel suggestions are dancing lessons from God."

3. "Tiger got to hunt, bird got to fly; Man got to sit and wonder, 'Why, why, why?' Tiger got to sleep, bird got to land; Man got to tell himself he understand."

4. "There's only one rule that I know of, babies—God damn it, you've got to be kind."

5. "She was a fool, and so am I, and so is anyone who thinks he sees what God is doing."

6. "Many people need desperately to receive this message: 'I feel and think much as you do, care about many of the things you care about, although most people do not care about them. You are not alone.'"

7. "There are plenty of good reasons for fighting, but no good reason ever to hate without reservation, to imagine that God Almighty Himself hates with you, too."

8. "Since Alice had never received any religious instruction, and since she had led a blameless life, she never thought of her awful luck as being anything but accidents in a very busy place. Good for her."

9. "That is my principal objection to life, I think: It's too easy, when alive, to make perfectly horrible mistakes."

10. "Literature should not disappear up its own asshole, so to speak."

11. "All persons, living and dead, are purely coincidental."

12. "Why don't you take a flying fuck at a rolling doughnut? Why don't you take a flying fuck at the mooooooooooooon?"

13. "So it goes."

14. "I have been a soreheaded occupant of a file drawer labeled 'science fiction' ever since, and I would like out, particularly since so many serious critics regularly mistake the drawer for a urinal."

15. "We must be careful about what we pretend to be."

For background information, read the article

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Please do not write

In Too lazy to assign a category on March 24, 2007 at 1:00 pm

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uploaded this image to flickr, click the image to go to the original flickr page

This is what my inner critic tells me all the time.

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Kurt Vonnegut

In Too lazy to assign a category on March 21, 2007 at 9:27 pm

Kurt Vonnegut

Eight rules for writing fiction:

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. Now matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

— Vonnegut, Kurt Vonnegut, Bagombo Snuff Box: Uncollected Short Fiction (New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons 1999), 9-10.

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“Ficlets” you ask?

In Too lazy to assign a category on March 13, 2007 at 9:46 pm

A ficlet is a short story that enables you to collaborate with the world.

Once you’ve written and shared your ficlet, any other user can pick up the narrative thread by adding a prequel or sequel. In this manner, you may know where the story begins, but you’ll never guess where (or even if!) it ends.

About Ficlets

Ficlets are shorter than short stories. Well, no, actually, they are short stories, but they’re really short stories. Really short, as in there’s not a maximum word count … there’s actually a maximum character count (1,024). There is also a minimum character count, and the number of that beast is 64.

If you wish, we’ll provide you with inspiration (photos, themes, suggested beginnings and endings, even other ficlets), but you’re completely free to blaze your own trail. Now, here’s where the real fun comes in: Each and every ficlet is modular in that, though you may have written a stand-alone story with a beginning, middle, and ending, your fellow ficleteers may choose to write a prequel or sequel to your story. In this respect, you can think of ficlets as literary Legos.

All ficlets are covered under Creative Commons, which means that if you wrote it, you own it. Period.

To give you an idea of what you can do with 1,024 characters, that is the exact length of this “About Ficlets” description.

Doesn't this sound like an excellent idea my dear Vox writers?

Ficlets

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Those Drinking Days

In Too lazy to assign a category on March 5, 2007 at 8:50 pm

"Almost to a man these dead geniuses spoke of themselves as heavy drinkers, as did I. Masterful, self-controlled, heavy drinkers. Not drunks, my God, no. At worst, and to make one’s self-image truly and formally clear, the term might be ‘functional alcoholic.’ But even that terrible label has a soulful thrust to it, as if this drunk is completely in focus! If I can still think—just think—then I’m half-way sober and can catch those fleeting ingenuities that otherwise get by me . . . I too am an alcoholic and once sat with my number one, el supremo smile before my typewriter, toppling in place over my copy, a farsighted blur pasted to my eyeballs. I patiently uncurled the English tongue to make it speak plain but it kept tying itself into gorgeous knots I couldn’t make sense of. And if the knot had a hard glow, like sunlight on snow, then I didn’t care about sense. This light overrode sense, or the need for it. Light is all. This, I’d assure myself with a thankful glance toward heaven, this is the best prose I’ve ever written." — Donald Newlove, Those Drinking Days: Myself and Other Writers

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Speak, Memory

In Too lazy to assign a category on February 22, 2007 at 8:58 pm

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Florence Wolfson kept a teenage “Mile Stones” diary from 1929 to 1934. Recently, the battered volume was reunited with its author. “I’m quite a busy young lady,” she said upon rereading it.

“THIS book belongs to …,” reads the frontispiece of the little red diary, followed by the words “Florence Wolfson” scrawled in faded black ink. Inside the worn leather cover, in brief, breathless dispatches written on gold-edged pages, the journal recorded five years of the life and times of a smart and headstrong New York teenager, a girl who loved Balzac, Central Park and male and female lovers with equal abandon.

Read the rest of this article in the New York Times

And … even more interesting, watch the Multimedia Presentation

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For the young who want to

In Too lazy to assign a category on February 5, 2007 at 11:10 am

For the young who want to

Talent is what they say
you have after the novel
is published and favorably
reviewed. Beforehand what
you have is a tedious
delusion, a hobby like knitting.

Work is what you have done
after the play is produced
and the audience claps.
Before that friends keep asking
when you are planning to go
out and get a job.

Genius is what they know you
had after the third volume
of remarkable poems. Earlier
they accuse you of withdrawing,
ask why you don't have a baby,
call you a bum.

The reason people want M.F.A.'s,
take workshops with fancy names
when all you can really
learn is a few techniques,
typing instructions and some-
body else's mannerisms

is that every artist lacks
a license to hang on the wall
like your optician, your vet
proving you may be a clumsy sadist
whose fillings fall into the stew
but you're certified a dentist.

The real writer is one
who really writes. Talent
is an invention like phlogiston*
after the fact of fire.
Work is its own cure. You have to
like it better than being loved.

*phlogiston: invisible hypothetical matter or `principle' thought to combine with all combustible bodies and be expelled during burning — a concept popular in the 18th century but abandoned once oxygen was discovered.

Original text: © Marge Piercy. Circles on the Water: Selected Poems of Marge Piercy (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982): 259-60. PS 3566 I4A6 1982
First publication date: 1980
Publication date note: The Moon Is Always Female (1980): 84.

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